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FOLLOW AUD ON
SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES
  • *** The University will be closed on Thursday, September 21, 2017 to celebrate the Islamic New Year
  • *** Withdrawal deadline for Fall 2017 semester is on November 9, 2017
  • ***Senior’s meeting with the registrar regarding Degree Audits completion (September 18 – October 19)
  • *** AUD ID cards for new students will be available in the Registrar’s Office starting Sunday, September 17, 2017
  • *** Fall 2017 semester starts September 04, 2017 and ends December 21, 2017
Course Descriptions
ANTH 201 | INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F, SI
This course introduces students to fundamental concepts and theories associated with culture and the study of the interconnection between culture and human behavior. Cultural concepts to be discussed include social relations, language, government, and religion. Awareness of these concepts allows students to appreciate the cultural diversity present in the contemporary world.
 
ANTH 301 | GLOBALIZATION (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ANTH 201, ECON 202, POLS 200 | S
This course provides students with a framework with which to understand and examine the complexities of globalization. The course looks at the impact of globalization on various cultural, political, and economic aspects of societies around the world. Scholarly articles from a wide range of authors and sources are central to this course.
 
ARTS 101 | ART APPRECIATION (3-0-3)
Corequisite: ENGL 101 | F, S, SI
This course provides a basic literacy in the visual arts (including drawing, printmaking, painting, camera arts, sculpture, and architecture). It is designed to promote and develop awareness of the visual arts, their principles and elements, their inherent aesthetic value and rich tradition, and a broad sense of their application.
 
ARTS 200 | HISTORY OF ART I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101 | F, S, SI
This is a traditional art and architecture history survey course, which begins with the cave paintings and continues through to the Renaissance. Artworks will be analyzed in their historical, sociological, and political context through slide and video presentations, including major works from Islamic, Chinese, and Mesopotamian cultures.
 
ARTS 201 | HISTORY OF ART II (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: ARTS 200, ENGL 102 | F, S
This course surveys the major developments in world art and architecture from the European
Renaissance through the 20th Century. The cultural and sociological contexts of art and the changing conditions of the artists and art production, as reflected in the new styles and movements of this period are examined.
 
ARTS 202 | HISTORY OF ART III (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: ARTS 200, ENGL 102 | S, SI
This course explores the art of the 20th century and through the first decade of the 21st, focusing on the transformation from Modernism to the post-modern context of arts and culture in contemporary societies. It examines the historical and theoretical background necessary for the understanding of seminal artworks and major art movements, and familiarizes students with critical concepts.
 
ARTS 203 | ARTISTIC FORMS OF EXPRESSION (3-0-3)
Corequisite: ENGL 102 | S
In this course, selected art forms are surveyed and presented as attempts of human beings to express themselves artistically in historical and cultural contexts; literary, theatrical, visual, and
musical art forms are covered.
 
ARTS 215 | MULTICULTURAL ART FORMS (3-0-3)
Corequisite: ENGL 102 | F
This is a survey course on the study of art forms represented in various world cultures. This course introduces the student to a variety of art forms from the world over which has influenced various cultures and their lifestyles.
 
BIOL 201 | PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY (3-0-3)
Corequisite: ENGL 101 (students will not receive credit for both BIOL 201 and SCIE 201) | F, S, SI
This course introduces students to principles of biology including basic concepts in biochemistry and bioenergetics, cell biology, genetics, speciation, ecology and conservation biology. It introduces students to the modern techniques and applications in biological sciences especially those relevant to biotechnology, biomedical applications and the sustainable development of natural resources in the environment.
 
BIOL 311 | INTRODUCTION TO BIOTECHNOLOGY (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BIOL 201 or SCIE 201, ENGL 101, MATH 101 (or higher) | F (odd years)
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of biotechnology and its applications. It will introduce students to fundamental scientific concepts in molecular biology and biotechnology emphasizing modern, cutting-edge emerging tools and applications in this area. Medical applications of biotechnology, industrial bio-manufacturing, bioremediation, forensic analysis, cloning and transgenic techniques, and aquaculture are some of the topics that students will be introduced to in this course. Students will have an opportunity to consider the ethical implication of emerging biotechnologies and their impact on communities.
 
CABR 275 | COURSE ABROAD (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 102, approval of dean | Upon Demand
Students travel to international cities to visit iconic locations and leading regulatory and professional institutions. The theme for each course abroad is chosen in advance from academic disciplines such as history, art, business or technology with faculty members serving as course leaders and facilitators. Scheduled class meetings are held before and after the trip, as part of the course requirements.
 
CHEM 201 | GENERAL CHEMISTRY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 100 | F, S, SI
Fundamental laws and theories of chemical reactions. Topics include atomic structure, bonding theory, stoichiometry, properties of solids, liquids, and gases; chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and kinetics; introduction to organic chemistry.
 
COMP 101 | INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS (3-0-3)
F, S, SI, SII
This course develops students’ abilities to understand computers, information technology, and related topics. It introduces fundamental technology concepts such as the Internet, software, and hardware. In addition, the course includes practical elements on some essential computer skills such as word processing, spreadsheets and presentations.
 
COMP 103 | THE INTERNET (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: COMP 101 | S
This course introduces web development techniques and tools, including WEB 2.0, blogs, WIKIS, social networking, HTML5, JQUERY, Javascript, hosting techniques, web development software packages and ethical considerations. Cloud computing and other trends and paradigms are also discussed.
 
ENGL 101 | COMPOSITION AND RHETORIC (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 100 with a P or P+, or placement by International TOEFL® and TWE or another internationally-recognized exam | F, S, SI, SII
This course develops students’ ability to write unified, cohesive and coherent essays. The rhetorical modes focused on in depth are Exemplification, Comparison-and-Contrast, and Cause-and-Effect. Because English 101 focuses on the revision stage of the writing process, students will engage in thoughtful analysis of their own as well as others’ writing. Students will explore the Reading/Writing connection and develop those reading skills which will be required throughout their academic and professional careers. Three process essays are required in the course.
 
ENGL 102 | ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND RESEARCH (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101 | F, S, SI, SII
This course, the 2nd in the English sequence of the AUD Arts and Sciences Core, builds upon the basic expository skills developed in ENGL 101. ENGL 102 introduces students to the process of producing discussions in the various rhetorical styles of Argument as well as the proper inclusion of outside source material using proper MLA guidelines in order to avoid plagiarism.
 
ENGL 103 | INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F, S, SI, SII
ENGL 103 is the 3rd course in the English sequence of the Arts and Sciences Core at AUD. The course gives students the opportunity to interact with texts in the genres of fiction, drama, poetry and essay. Texts represent a wide range of authors, cultures and perspectives. The course reinforces skills students acquired in ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, specifically critical reading, forming and supporting an argument, and research.
 
ENGL 210 | CREATIVE WRITING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | F, S
The class introduces students to the various genres of creative writing—short story, creative non-fiction, and poetry. In this course students are exposed to examples of each genre; they participate in workshops evaluating both published and their own work. Over the course of the semester, students produce a portfolio of work in the genre(s) focused on that term. Specific course focus will be determined by the instructor.
 
ENGL 211 | BRITISH LITERATURE I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | Upon demand
This course involves the study of major works and literary movements in British literature from the Old English period to, and including, the Restoration and the 18th century. Readings include those by Chaucer, Shakespeare, Swift, and Pope. The contributions of female authors are highlighted in various time periods.
 
ENGL 212 | BRITISH LITERATURE II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | Upon demand
This second course in the British Literature series involves the study of the major works and literary movements in British literature from the Romantic period to the present. The course begins with an extensive study of the Romantic poets, then moves on to the fiction of the Victorian Age and the early Twentieth Century, before focusing on the modern poets.
 
ENGL 221 | AMERICAN LITERATURE I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | Upon demand
This course involves the study of major works and literary movements in American literature from the time of Discovery until the post-Civil War Reconstruction. The course begins with literature from explorers and Native Americans and proceeds to literary works produced by colonists and immigrants, and then short fiction and philosophical treatises. The course culminates with a study of literature from the American Civil War period.
 
ENGL 222 | AMERICAN LITERATURE II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | Upon demand
This second course in the American Literature sequence involves the study of major works and literary movements in American literature from the American Civil War to the present. The works are produced by Native American, African American, Female and Expatriate authors as well as social commentators. Special attention is paid to determining what makes all of these works “American.”
 
ENGL 231 | WORLD LITERATURE I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | Upon demand
This course offers a survey of world literature from ancient times through the middle of the 17th century. The readings include epics such as Gilgamesh and the Odyssey; stories within-stories, such as the Decameron and The Thousand and One Nights; novels and dramas; and Paradise Lost.
 
ENGL 232 | WORLD LITERATURE II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | Upon demand
This course provides students with an exploration of literature(s) from various parts of the globe from the middle of the 17th century to the present. Readings include those from authors from Europe, Asia, Africa, South America, and the Middle East. Common themes between authors and texts are discussed.
 
ENGL 305 | THE EPIC (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | Upon demand
This course exposes students to the study of representative works of epic literature from pre- literate societies to today. The course examines the literary, cultural, and human significance of the epic literature of the Western and non-Western literary traditions.
 
ENGL 311 | WORLD MYTHOLOGY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | S (even years)
This course covers three central categories contained in bodies of mythology throughout the world: Creation Myths, Fertility Myths and Hero Myths. A cross-cultural analysis of similarities and differences of the mythology in each category is central to the course presentation.
 
ENGL 312 | BIOGRAPHY/AUTOBIOGRAPHY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | Upon demand
This course examines biography/autobiography as a literary genre. The course focuses on the characteristics of the genre and the personal, cultural and global impact of the genre.
 
ENGL 313 | CHILDREN’S LITERATURE (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | Upon Demand
This course explores the historical and cultural development of children’s literature from the 17th century through the latter 20th century.
 
ENGL 314 | COMING-OF-AGE NOVELS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | Upon demand
This course examines numerous coming-of-age novels from various cultures to explore the potential “sameness” of the experience for the protagonists.
 
ENGL 315 | CONTEMPORARY FEMALE AUTHORS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | Upon demand
This course examines the literary works produced by women authors from the midpoint of the 20th century to the present. Genres to be discussed include prose, poetry and essay.
 
ENGL 316 | PRIZE-WINNING AUTHORS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | Upon demand
This course exposes students to works (both in total and in part) produced by those authors recognized by either the Nobel or Booker Prize Committee as outstanding. Authors and works discussed may change according to the instructor.
 
FREN 101 | ELEMENTARY FRENCH I (3-0-3)
F, S, SI
This course provides the student with an oral and written approach to beginning French grammar and conversation, with special emphasis on communication skills. Individual daily work with language tapes is an essential part of the program.
 
FREN 102 | ELEMENTARY FRENCH II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: FREN 101 or equivalent | S, SI
This course is a continuation of French 101, with expansion of vocabulary and possibilities of expression.
 
FREN 201 | INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: FREN 102 or equivalent | F, SI
This course continues the development of French language and culture from FREN 102, using an oral and written approach to advance French grammar and conversation, with emphasis on communication skills.
 
FREN 202 | INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: FREN 201 or equivalent | S, SI
This course is a continuation of FREN 201, with greater depth and using more complex language and maturity of expression and comprehension. Students encounter a wide range of current affairs, special topics like art, architecture and science, and issues of cultural and moral values.
 
GEOG 101 | WORLD GEOGRAPHY (3-0-3)
S
This course presents the important principles basic to the proper understanding of the world in which we live. Emphasis is placed on the study of the changing world map and the importance of this to human, economic, and political relationships.
 
GEOG 310 | HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 102, BIOL 201 or SCIE 201 or SCIE 211 | Upon demand
This course examines the relationships between people and place, whether purposeful or unintended. It examines what factors play the greatest role in determining where large groups of people situate themselves. Some aspects to be included in class discussion are migration, displacement, culture, transportation, natural resources and environment.
 
HIST 201 | AMERICAN HISTORY FROM THE BEGINNINGS TO RECONSTRUCTION (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F (odd years)
This course examines the history of what ultimately became the United States of America. HIST 201 traces the development of the New World from discovery, through colonization, the war for independence, up through and including the Civil War and Reconstruction. The course focuses on how the various political, cultural, and social issues of the various time periods combined to influence the landmark events in the development of the nation.
 
HIST 202 | AMERICAN HISTORY FROM THE CIVIL WAR TO THE PRESENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | S (odd years)
This course is a continuation of HIST 201. The course focuses on those elements after the Civil War which contributed to the formation of the American democracy and how the nation established itself as a world leader. Special attention is paid to the World Wars and other conflicts in which America has played a central role. In addition, the continued development of cultural diversity within its borders is explored. The course culminates in a discussion of where the nation seems to be heading at the beginning of the 21st century.
 
HIST 212 | EUROPEAN HISTORY FROM THE RENAISSANCE TO THE PRESENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F (even years)
This course covers the time period during which appeared the most significant intellectual, political, and social concepts which formed the foundation of the modern world. Special attention is paid to the individuals, the movements, and the –isms (i.e., Communism, Socialism) which were involved in the landmark events during the time period studied.
 
HIST 251 | WORLD HISTORY FROM BEGINNINGS TO 1500 (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | S (even years)
This course covers the most significant events in World History from the beginnings of recorded time to 1500. The course takes a cause-and-effect approach to the study of historical occurrences. In addition, special emphasis is placed on the isolated nature of many early civilizations and then
the beginnings of connections of peoples through trade, empire, and exploration.
 
HIST 252 | WORLD HISTORY FROM 1500 TO THE PRESENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | S, SI
This course covers the most significant events in World History from 1500 to the Present. Emphasis is placed on the continued pattern of connection and interdependence among peoples, nations, and regions of the world.
 
HIST 310 | THE U.S. IN WORLD AFFAIRS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F
This course provides an understanding of the major issues and trends facing the U.S. in the contemporary international system.
 
HIST 350 | REVOLUTION (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 102, HIST 252 | S
This course examines the conditions which are necessary for revolutionary movements to emerge and revolutions to occur. Touching upon some historically well-known conflicts referred to as “revolutions,” the course focuses primarily on the revolutionary movements and revolutions which have taken place in the 20th century. Additional aspects to be discussed include the immediate aftermath and lasting impacts of the revolutions. Special attention is paid to Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East.
 
HIST 401 | CONTEMPORARY HISTORICAL ISSUES (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: ANTH 201, ECON 201, HIST 252, POLS 200 | Upon demand
This seminar-style course asks students to explore current issues in history. The primary focus of the course is history. In addition, all students are expected to look at the cultural, political, and business factors involved. The course is designed to allow students to explore a primary area of interest while maintaining the interrelationships of all major areas of the BAIS degree. This course is also open to non-BAIS students.
 
HUMN 275 | SELECTED TOPICS IN HUMANITIES (3-0-3)
Upon demand
Topics in the Humanities which are not covered by other course offerings. The specific topics will be determined by student/instructor interest. Students should check with the Registrar or Dean of Arts and Sciences to determine course content for a specific semester.
 
HUMN 475 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN HUMANITIES (3-0-3)
Upon demand
Advanced topics in the Humanities which are not covered by other course offerings. The specific topics will be determined by student/instructor interest. Students should check with the Registrar or Dean of Arts and Sciences to determine course content for a specific semester.
 
INST 498 | INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CAPSTONE I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Senior Status | F
This course provides students with the fundamentals of conducting research. In addition, it is during this course that students receive approval for their project which involves all of the core areas of the Bachelor of Arts degree in International Studies. This project must be approved prior to students’ enrollment in INST 499.
 
INST 499 | INTERNATIONAL STUDIES CAPSTONE II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: INST 498 | S
This course involves the production of the approved project from INST 498. Students meet on a weekly basis with their instructor to discuss progress and/or challenges to completing the project. Students are ultimately required to given an oral presentation to a panel prior to final completion of the course. INST 499 is a requirement for graduation for all students in the Bachelor of Arts in International Studies program.
 
ITAL 101 | ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I (3-0-3)
F, S, SI
This course is an introduction to the Italian language and culture. The emphasis is on developing the basics of vocabulary, pronunciation, sentence structure and grammar. Students learn the fundamentals of oral and written communication by engaging in basic conversational Italian, and are introduced to the Italian culture.
 
ITAL 102 | ELEMENTARY ITALIAN II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ITAL 101 or equivalent | S, SI
This course continues an introduction to the Italian language and culture. The emphasis is on ensuring the competence of basic Italian vocabulary, pronunciation, sentence structure and grammar. Students learn the fundamentals of oral and written communication by engaging in basic conversational Italian, and are introduced to the Italian culture.
 
ITAL 201 | INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ITAL 102 or equivalent | F
This course advances the development of students’ Italian language competence beyond the basic level in the four skill areas of listening, reading, speaking and writing. It also continues to advance cultural awareness through interaction with media and print, and builds competence in reading comprehension.
 
ITAL 202 | INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ITAL 201 or equivalent | S
This course develops students’ Italian language competence into the intermediate level in the four skill areas of listening, reading, speaking and writing. It also continues to advance cultural awareness through interaction with emphasis on composition, literature and communication skills.
 
MATH 101 | MATHEMATICS FOR THE ARTS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: placement by ACCUPLACER™ or a Grade of P or P+ in MATH 100 | F, S, SI
This course surveys traditional and contemporary topics in mathematics, such as counting techniques, probability and statistics, and the mathematics of personal finance. It includes basic
geometry of interest to students applicable in the arts program.
 
MATH 105 | PRECALCULUS FOR ARCHITECTURE (3-3-4)
Prerequisite: placement by SAT or ACCUPLACER™, or MATH 100 | F, S, SI
Geometry; properties and applications of polynomials, exponentials, logarithmic and trigonometric functions; applied trigonometry; vectors; and theory of equations.
MATH 110 | PRECALCULUS (3-3-4)
Prerequisite: placement by SAT or ACCUPLACER™, or MATH 100 | F, S, SI
Analytic geometry. Quadratic, logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions. Systems of linear and nonlinear equations. Vectors.
MATH 200 | MATHEMATICS WITH BUSINESS APPLICATIONS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: placement by ACCUPLACER™ or a Grade of P or P+ in MATH 100 | F, S,
SI, SII
This course introduces the main mathematical tools used in the business environment. The focus of attention is on developing the basic concepts of calculus, such as functions, derivatives, and integrals. Topics from probability and various applications to business are also explored.
 
MATH 205 | CALCULUS FOR ARCHITECTURE (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: placement by ACCUPLACER™ or MATH 105 | F, S, SI
This course reviews the basic concepts of differentiation and integration for functions of one variable. Topics include limits and continuity, derivatives and integrals and their applications, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and the calculus applied to parametric curves and polar graphs.
 
MATH 210 | CALCULUS I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: placement by ACCUPLACER™, or MATH 110 with a grade of C or higher | F, S, SI
Differential and integral calculus applied to functions of a single variable. Derivatives, applications of derivatives, indefinite and definite integrals and applications of integrals. Polynomial, rational, radical, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, logarithmic and hyperbolic functions.
 
MATH 220 | CALCULUS II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 210 with a grade of C or higher | F, S, SI
Techniques of integration, including integration by parts, partial fractions and trigonometric substitution. Improper integrals. Sequences and series, including power, Taylor and Fourier series. Linear approximations and Taylor’s theorem. Polar functions and parametric equations.
 
MATH 230 | LINEAR ALGEBRA AND COMPLEX VARIABLES (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 220 with a grade of C or higher | F, S
Linear systems, matrices, vector spaces and linear independence. Linear transformations, determinants, eigenvalues, and applications. Complex numbers in Cartesian and polar planes. Complex functions including trigonometric and hyperbolic functions. Cauchy’s integral theorem.
 
MATH 231 | DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 220 with a grade of C or higher | F, S
Methods for obtaining numerical and analytical solutions of linear differential equations. Systems of linear and nonlinear differential equations. Laplace Transform with applications. Introduction to Fourier Transform.
 
MATH 240 | MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 230 | F, S
Functions of several variables. Surfaces. Vector functions and parametrizations. Gradient function and optimization. Double and triple integrals. Cylindrical and spherical coordinates. Line integrals and surface integrals. Theorems of Green, Gauss and Stokes.
 
MATH 250 | DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: placement by ACCUPLACER™ or MATH 110 with a grade of C or higher | S
Introduction to the mathematical foundation of computing, including logical reasoning, sets, relations, and functions. Mathematical induction and counting. Complexity and analysis of algorithms. Recurrence, graph theory, and trees.
 
MATH 310 | HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 101 or higher | F
This course examines the content of historical documents that trace the roots of arithmetic, algebra and geometry from ancient times until the 13th century. The sources come from a variety of civilizations and cultures, and reveal common threads in the development of mathematics due to the needs of society, along with differences caused by cultural influences.
 
MATH 320 | CONTEMPORARY PROBLEM SOLVING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 101 or higher | S
A variety of thinking processes and specific techniques are introduced for defining and solving problems and for building mathematical models. Those tools are then used by students in games of strategy, mathematical problems and real-world situations, with the prime directive being: “Solve that problem!”
 
MATH 330 | MAKING DECISIONS FROM INTERPRETING DATA (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 101 or higher | Upon demand
This is an introductory course in statistics, which deals with the study of variability, uncertainty and decision-making. Statistics is increasingly applicable to most disciplines and to everyday life. This course introduces the basic principles from contemporary usage, with consideration for appropriateness, contextual relevance and interpretation.
 
MEST 101 | ELEMENTARY ARABIC I (3-0-3)
F, S, SI
An introduction to Modern Standard Arabic. Skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing are developed. Not open to native speakers of Arabic.
 
MEST 102 | ELEMENTARY ARABIC II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MEST 101 | F, S, SI
This is a continuation of MEST 101, with expansion of vocabulary and capability of both oral and written expression. Not open to native speakers of Arabic.
 
MEST 200 | THE U.A.E. EXPERIENCE (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | Upon demand
This course examines the U.A.E. as a post-oil society in the Middle East. The relevant aspects of the federation, including the U.A.E.’s economic bases (oil, a diversified economy) and its internal challenges (Emiratization, water and electricity consumption, etc.) will be analyzed. Emphasis will be put on Dubai as an example of a global city in a traditional environment.
 
MEST 201 | INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MEST 102 | F, SI
This is a continuation of MEST 102, with increased emphasis on vocabulary acquisition. Not open to native speakers of Arabic.
 
MEST 202 | INTERMEDIATE ARABIC II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MEST 201 | S, SI
This course is the sequel to MEST 201 and continues to develop the four skills in language acquisition – reading, writing, listening, and speaking – to further refine the student’s ability to communicate in Arabic at the intermediate level. Not open to native speakers of Arabic.
 
MEST 210 | AN INTRODUCTION TO MIDDLE EAST HISTORY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F, S, SI
This course will examine the rise of Islam in the lands of the Near East as a distinctive period in the history of the region, beginning with the eclipsing of the Byzantine and Sassanid empires in the early 7th century and ending with the collapsing of the Ottoman Empire in the aftermath of WWI.
 
MEST 275 | SELECTED TOPICS IN MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES (3-0-3)
Upon demand
A critical study of theory and research related to topics in Middle Eastern studies not covered by other courses. The specific topics will be determined by interests of the students and the instructor. Students should check with the Registrar or Dean of Arts and Sciences to determine course content for a specific semester.
 
MEST 301 | ARABIC PROFICIENCY I (3-0-3)
F, S
A course in Modern Standard Arabic at the advanced level designed to provide Arabic-speaking B.C.I.S. Majors with the linguistic skills (writing, reading, speaking, listening) that serve as a solid foundation for journalistic expression in Arabic. Emphasis is placed on grammar review, vocabulary acquisition, and composition. Several modern literary texts are used in the course. This course is open only to students with significant prior knowledge/study of Arabic.
 
MEST 302 | ARABIC PROFICIENCY II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MEST 301 | S
This is a continuation of MEST 301, with expansion of vocabulary and capability of expression, both orally and in writing. Literary texts of increasing sophistication are used in the course. Students exiting this course will be prepared to follow the Arabic track of the B.C.I.S. program.
 
MEST 310 | ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F, S
This course explores various aspects of Islam as a civilization and the key achievements made by those who participated in the pursuit of knowledge under the cultural aegis of Islam. Developments in the fields of philosophy, mathematics, astronomy and medicine are some of the major themes highlighted as the course charts the role of Islamic civilization in the transmission of knowledge and ideas to the Mediterranean, Europe and beyond.
 
MEST 315 | HISTORY OF THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F
This course concentrates on the emergence of the modern Middle East by examining its transformation into nation states following the collapse of the Ottoman Empire after WWI, the mandate period and the end of colonial rule. The course will focus on key events and developments across the region from Egypt to Iran, and from Turkey to the Gulf States during the last century.
 
MEST 317 | MIDDLE EASTERN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 103 | S
This course considers a representative sample of Arabic prose, short stories, novels and plays with a brief account of critical background of the various genres.
 
MEST 318 | CULTURES OF THE MIDDLE EAST (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F, SI
This course provides an overview of the various cultures in the Middle East within an anthropological framework. Concepts such as ‘family’, ‘gender’ and ‘society’ are used as the basis for comparison of various cultural groups in the region.
 
MEST 319 | POLITICS IN THE MIDDLE EAST (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | S, SI
This course looks at the political structures and systems of governance across the contemporary Middle East as well as the historical factors that led to their formation. The course also examines the complex but significant relationship between local politics and politics at the level of state and government within individual Middle East countries in order to explain how this relationship has shaped policies both at the regional and at the international levels.
 
MEST 320 | THE QUR’AN: TEXT, HISTORY, AND MEANING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F
This course examines the historical aspects of the Qur’an, such as the period of its ‘revelation’, its subsequent codification and the tradition of its interpretation. The course also focuses on the contents of the Qur’an as well as its place in various Muslim intellectual traditions, both medieval and modern.
 
MEST 323 | ISLAM: HISTORICAL AND SOCIETAL ASPECTS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F, S, SI
This course is a study of the Islamic religious tradition and its development during various historical periods. The course focuses on the beliefs and practices of Muslims across diverse cultural landscapes as well as on the major schools of thought within Islam. The scope of the course extends to the contemporary period to include an analysis of modern intellectual movements.
 
MEST 327 | ISLAMIC POLITICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F
This course will focus on Islam as the language of politics at both the societal level and at the level of state and government. It will examine the influence of the teachings of Islam and Islamic political thought on the organization of society in the Muslim world, and account for the emergence of Islamic states, Islamist movements and the contemporary phenomenon of ‘political Islam’.
 
MEST 329 | ISLAMIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F, S, SI
This course is a general survey of Islamic art in its various forms from its beginnings in the 7th century to the early modern period. The development will be traced through the examination of architecture, manuscript illustration, textiles, pottery and other art forms.
 
MEST 330 | THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST (c. 3500 B.C.E.-100 C.E.) (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | Upon demand
This course surveys the history of this region from the period beginning with the rise of Sumerian city-states to the Jewish revolts of the 1st century C.E., taking in along the way some of the most significant inventions and innovations by ancient Egyptian and Mesopotamian civilizations. Parallel developments in the early history of monotheistic belief are also examined. This course contains an ancient language ‘familiarization’ component (Akkadian or Aramaic).
 
MEST 333 | THE MIDDLE EAST IN LATE ANTIQUITY (c. 250 – 800 C.E.) (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | Upon demand
This course examines a spectrum of intellectual (philosophical), gnostic and religious traditions (Judaeo-Christian, Manichaean, Mandaean) that cut across an ethnic mosaic of Middle Eastern communities living under the shadow of one of the two immense imperial systems of the period, the Byzantine Roman empire and the Persian Sassanian empire. The course contains an element of language ‘familiarization’ (Greek and Aramaic/Syriac).
 
MEST 343 | BUSINESS IN THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | S
This course offers descriptive and prescriptive approaches to the economies of the Middle East. The course examines the current status of the economies in the region and how they developed. In addition, discussion will focus on economic challenges in the region. Suggestions for addressing these challenges as well as the consequences of ignoring them will also be discussed.
 
MEST 350 | RELIGIONS OF THE MIDDLE EAST (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | S
This course examines the beliefs, practices and institutions of the three Abrahamic faiths in the Middle East: Islam, Christianity, and Judaism. This course also considers the shared origins and histories of these three religions, in particular the history of their interaction and interdependence in the Middle East.
 
MEST 352 | CONFLICTS IN THE MIDDLE EAST (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | S
This course examines the conflicts which have taken place in the Middle East since the end of the World War II. These conflicts include those between nations, cultures, and ideologies.
 
MEST 353 | WOMEN AND GENDER IN THE MIDDLE EAST (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | S
This course explores traditional gender roles in Middle East society, historically and in modern times. It focuses on the lives of key female figures in Middle East history with a view to delineating societal attitudes towards women in the region up to the modern day. The course also examines the role played by religion and religious authorities in the formation and confirmation of such attitudes. In addition, the imperatives of contemporary Middle Eastern women’s voices are surveyed as these manifest themselves in film, literature and other intellectual output.
 
MEST 380 | THE GULF: CULTURE AND ECONOMICS SINCE 1970 (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | SI
This course looks at the modernization of the Gulf region since the withdrawal of Great Britain in 1971. It analyzes the advancements and the dynamics taking place in the Gulf in the political and economic sectors.
 
MEST 381 | NORTH AFRICA: NATION, SOCIETY, AND CULTURE (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | Upon demand
This course examines the art, literature, and other aspects of culture in the nations of North Africa and how these important aspects have contributed to the shaping of those societies during various important recent historical periods.
 
MEST 382 | THE LEVANT: ARAB LANDS OF THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | S
This course focuses on the area extending from the Turko-Syrian border to Syro-Palestine, encompassing also present-day Lebanon and Jordan. The region is analyzed in terms of cultural continuity and religious diversity against the background of major political events.
 
MEST 383 | IRAQ: REINVENTING THE NATION (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F
This course surveys the history of the modern nation-state of Iraq in its religious, social and political dimensions. The background and long aftermath of both the Iraq-Iran War and the First Gulf War constitute some of the major focus of the course along with developments within the country since the fall of the Baath regime in 2003.
 
MEST 384 | EGYPT: LITERATURE SINCE 1952 (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | Upon demand
This course examines the intricate relationship which has existed in Egypt between creative writers and the state since the coup d’état of 1952. It explores the ways in which creative writers have navigated between the narrow straits of governmental restrictions and societal mores and how these writers have ultimately shaped current Egyptian culture.
 
MEST 475 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN MIDDLE EASTERN STUDIES (3-0-3)
Upon demand
A critical study of theory and research at a relatively advanced level related to topics in Middle Eastern studies not covered by other courses. The specific topics will be determined by interests of the students and the instructor. Students should check with the Registrar or Dean of Arts and Sciences to determine course content for a specific semester.
 
PHIL 105 | INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL THINKING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101 | F, S
This course presents formal thinking processes and the utility of critical thinking skills in different situations. Students learn to connect effective thinking, attention to detail, weighing positive and negative factors, and personal responsibility for decisions. Reading, writing, speaking and listening are emphasized throughout the course.
 
PHIL 201 | INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY/LOGIC (3-0-3)
Corequisite: ENGL 102 | F, S, SI
This course is a survey of fundamental problems in several major divisions of philosophy, such as axiology, logic, philosophy of religion, epistomology and metaphysics. This course offers an overview of the basic aims, approaches and types of issues in philosophy, while enabling students to explore the place of philosophy in the development and justification of personal values.
 
PHIL 222 | PROFESSIONAL ETHICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F, S, SI
This course discusses professional workplace responsibility within the context of meta-ethics and applied ethics. Specific topics include professional interests of clients and employers, safety and liability, public welfare, whistleblowing, and legal obligations. It also reviews professional codes of ethics and examines case studies involving professional ethics.
 
PHIL 310 | ETHICS AND MORAL PHILOSOPHY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: PHIL 201 | S
This course offers an introduction to the history of moral philosophy and an exploration of contemporary ethical debates. Through the reading of various foundational texts, both ancient and modern, this course provides an overview of the basic aims, approaches, and types of moral reasoning. Emphasis is on placing debates within a global context and encouraging students to develop their own philosophical perspectives.
 
PHIL 320 | METAPHYSICS AND THE STUDY OF HUMAN EXISTENCE (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: PHIL 201 | F
This course provides the study of human existence through metaphysics – the branch of philosophy concerned with questioning “What is real?” Through the reading of foundational texts, both ancient and modern, this course offers a detailed assessment of the history and development of metaphysical inquiry and its relevance to significant, contemporary philosophical questions. Emphasis is on placing significant philosophical questions in a broad human context and encouraging students to develop their own philosophical perspectives.
 
PHYS 201 | INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS I W/LAB (3-3-4)
Corequisite: MATH 205 or MATH 210 | F, S, SI
Motion in two and three dimensions, Newton’s laws, concepts of energy and potential, rotation, Gravitational fields, statics, fluid dynamics and thermodynamics.
 
PHYS 202 | INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS II W/LAB (3-3-4)
Prerequisites: PHYS 201, MATH 210 | F, S, SI
Mechanical waves, electrostatics and electrodynamics, fundamentals of electromagnetics, DC and AC circuits, properties of light including interference and diffraction.
 
POLS 200 | INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F, SI
This course provides students with an overview of contemporary political issues and strategies for examining them. The course discusses various ways groups of people have tried to govern themselves justly and effectively. Focus is on practical as well as theoretical explanations of different political systems and ideologies.
 
POLS 201 | COMPARATIVE POLITICAL SYSTEMS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: POLS 200 | F (even years)
This course is a broad overview of various current political structures, some at different points of development, in representative nations in the world outside of the United States. Special emphasis is placed on political theory. Political systems may include democracies (established and developing), authoritarian regimes, and religious-based political systems.
 
POLS 210 | INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F
This course examines those elements which most significantly affect how nations and nation-states establish relationships with each other and how they conduct themselves once those relationships are established. In essence, the course addresses the question “How do political entities get along, if at all?”
 
POLS 310 | POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102, POLS 200 | S (even years)
This course examines the interrelationship between political phenomena (institutions, processes, behaviors) and the physical geography in which these occur. Some of the concepts discussed include territory and the control of natural resources.
 
POLS 320 | THE UNITED NATIONS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: POLS 200 | S (odd years)
This course provides information to students about the historical development and current status of the United Nations. Discussion centers around the various branches of the UN and their effectiveness in addressing serious on-going global concerns. The course ultimately focuses on the future relevance of the UN and its contributions to global governance and cooperation.
 
POLS 325 | INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: POLS 200 | F (odd years)
This course introduces students to the roles various international organizations play in the overall attempts to address various global issues. The first half of the course is dedicated to intergovernmental organizations (IGOs); the second half focuses on non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Discussions revolve around organizations which target similar global issues.
 
POLS 330 | FOREIGN POLICY (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: POLS 210 | F (odd years)
This course provides theoretical approaches and explanations for how countries formulate and implement foreign policy. It examines implementation of foreign policies in the international arena and analyzes case studies on how foreign policies seem to create or resolve international conflicts.
 
POLS 340 | INTERNATIONAL DIPLOMACY (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: POLS 210 | S (odd years)
In this course, students learn the various aspects of being a diplomat. Much of the course focuses on negotiations that take place in the current global environment and involve the official and unofficial parties that play a role in those negotiations.
 
POLS 341 | HISTORY OF DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: POLS 210 | F (even years)
This course analyzes the evolution of the art of diplomacy through the centuries. It surveys the events, accomplishments, and thoughts which have shaped its historical development into the peaceful conduct of relations among political entities, their principals and accredited agents.
 
POLS 401 | CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL ISSUES (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: ANTH 201, ECON 201, HIST 252, POLS 200 | Upon demand
This seminar-style course asks students to explore current issues in politics. The primary focus of the course is politics, but all students are expected to look at the historical, business, and cultural factors involved as well. The course is designed to allow students to explore a primary area of interest while maintaining the interrelationships of all major areas of the BAIS degree. This course is also open to non-BAIS students.
 
POLS 415 | GEOPOLITICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: POLS 210 | S (even years)
Geopolitics analyzes the relationship between geography (location, size, natural resources, demographics, activities, etc.), and the political tensions that crystallize on a given space. Cases will be presented to introduce the prevalent thinking processes and how they apply to contemporary conditions.
 
PSPK 101 | PUBLIC SPEAKING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F, S, SI, SII
This course develops confidence and poise in the public speaker. Students learn to 1) apply current developments in communications and social psychology as they prepare narrative, persuasive, informative and descriptive speeches, and 2) demonstrate understanding of the interaction between speaker, speech and audience.
 
PSYC 201 | GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY (3-0-3)
F, S, SI, SII
This course is designed to introduce students to the various theories and contributions in the field of psychology. It includes the topics of learning, memory, language development, perception, theories of emotion, personality theory, child development and social psychology.
 
PSYC 313 | SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: PSYC 201 | S
This course is intended to introduce the students to the basic concepts and topics in the field of social psychology. Topics in this course include the social self, attitudes and persuasion, attribution theory, groups, pro-social behavior and altruism, attraction, nonverbal communication, aggression, prejudice and discrimination, the impact of the environment on behavior, social psychology, and the legal system and social psychology of health.
 
PSYC 415 | PSYCHOLOGY OF ADVERTISING AND MASS MEDIA (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: ENGL 102, PSYC 201 | S
This course examines the role of mass media and the effects of advertising in issues of sex roles, sexual attitudes and violence. Emphasis is placed on behavioral, psychological, and physiological reactions on the acquisition of imitative response.
 
SCIE 201 | LIFE SCIENCES FOR TODAY (3-0-3)
Corequisite: ENGL 101 (students will not receive credit for both BIOL 201 and SCIE 201) | F, S, SI
This course introduces students to basics of life sciences including topics that address health and disease, the diversity of life on Earth, and the environment. The course integrates current issues to teach biological concepts. Topics covered include cellular structure, dietetics, genetics in health and disease, evolutionary relationships and environmental sciences.
 
SCIE 211 | WATER SUSTAINABILITY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101, MATH 100 | Upon demand
This course presents an overview of water sustainability by highlighting the importance of water in sustaining life, biodiversity, human health and development. Students will evaluate scientific, technical and socio-economic solutions to sustainably manage global water supplies.
 
SCIE 241 | PRINCIPLES OF HUMAN NUTRITION (3-0-3)
Corequisite: ENGL 101 | F, S, SI
The course provides an overview of complete nutritional requirements needed by humans for the maintenance of good health throughout life and in the prevention of disease. Topics discussed will include dietary sources, nutritional guidelines, food labeling, weight management, and the role of evidence-based science, culture, education and media in dietary choices, practices and policies.
 
SCIE 275 | SELECTED TOPICS IN NATURAL SCIENCES (3-0-3)
Upon demand
Topics in the natural sciences which are not covered by other course offerings. The specific topics will be determined by student/instructor interest. Students should check with the Registrar or Dean of Arts and Sciences to determine course content for a specific semester.
 
SCIE 311 | PRINCIPLES OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: BIOL 201, SCIE 201 or SCIE 211, ENGL 101, MATH 101 or higher | S
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles of environmental sciences. The course will cover important environmental themes such as biodiversity, environmental conservation, population issues, pollution, waste management strategies, and sustainable development. Students will have an opportunity to examine contemporary environmental issues and international environmental policies which directly impact their lives.
 
SCIE 341 | PUBLIC HEALTH (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 101, MATH 101or higher | F (even years)
This course introduces public health as an interdisciplinary science concerned with topics central to the health of populations and their physical, mental, and social well-being. The course focuses on current pertinent public health problems, assessing causation and examining intervention and management strategies from personal, social, and organizational levels.
 
SCIE 475 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN NATURAL SCIENCES (3-0-3)
Upon demand
Advanced topics in the natural sciences which are not covered by other course offerings. The specific topics will be determined by student/instructor interest. Students should check with the Registrar or Dean of Arts and Sciences to determine course content for a specific semester.
 
SOCI 101 | INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (3-0-3)
F, S, SI
This introductory course to sociology provides students with an understanding of how individuals within various societies interact both as individuals and as members of various groups within those societies. The course examines what motivates individuals to form and belong to groups, and how those groups affect change within a given society. The course also examines unequal power relationships between different groups in a given society.
 
SOCI 217 | CROSS-CULTURAL RELATIONS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: SOCI 101 | F
This course examines the dynamics of communication between cultures. It introduces basic theories related to intercultural relations, examines how culture is evident in languages, behaviors, rituals, and world views, and provides students with practical insight into how to enhance communication between members of different cultures.
 
SOCI 340 | TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102, SOCI 101 | S (even years)
This course examines the complex nature of the relationship between technological advancements and the societies in which those advancements take place. The primary focus of the course will be the technological advancements which have taken place between the middle of the 20th century and the present day. Discussion will focus on the societal effects of the most recent technological developments. Among other areas, the course focuses on significant technological advancements in the fields of energy, health, war, the environment, and communication.
 
SOCI 342 | LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102, SOCI 101 | Upon demand
This course explores the interrelationship between language and society. Changes in society necessitate changes in that society’s language. Topics for discussion include the connections between language and identity, religion, gender, and culture.
 
SOCI 344 | GENDER AND SOCIETY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102, SOCI 101 | F (odd years)
This course examines the ways in which various societies and cultures within those societies influence the gender roles of their members. Course discussion involves how concepts of ‘masculinity’ and ‘femininity’ are determined. Gender stereotypes, differences and similarities, limitations, and their impact on areas of culture are also explored.
 
SOCI 346 | SPORTS AND SOCIETY (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102, SOCI 101 | Upon demand
This course examines the role that sports play in various societies. While some sports are global in nature (e.g. soccer, rugby), the role they play in various cultures is quite different. Discussion in this course will also explore why some sports have flourished in some cultures and not in others. The impact of international sporting events (e.g., Olympics, World Cup) on various cultures will also be discussed.
 
SPAN 101 | ELEMENTARY SPANISH I (3-0-3)
F, S, SI
Long recognized for its cultural significance, the Spanish language continues to grow in importance in the design and business communities. This course provides students with oral and written approaches to beginning Spanish grammar skills. Individual daily work with language tapes is an essential part of the program.
 
SPAN 102 | ELEMENTARY SPANISH II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or equivalent | S, SI
This course is a continuation of Spanish 101, with expansion of vocabulary and possibilities of expression.
 
SPAN 201 | INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or equivalent | F, SI
This course continues the development of Spanish language and culture from SPAN 102, using an oral and written approach to advance Spanish grammar and conversation, with emphasis on communication skills.
 
SPAN 202 | INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: SPAN 201 or equivalent | S, SI
This is a continuation of SPAN 201, featuring practice in speaking, reading and writing with emphasis on cultural and literary readings, composition and grammar review. This completes the sequence of four language courses where the aim continues toward a higher level of language acquisition to maximize each student’s language skills.
 
SSCI 275 | SELECTED TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES (3-0-3)
Upon demand
Topics in the social sciences which are not covered by other course offerings. The specific topics will be determined by student/instructor interest. Students should check with the Registrar or Dean of Arts and Sciences to determine course content for a specific semester.
 
SSCI 475 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL SCIENCES (3-0-3)
Upon demand
Advanced topics in the social sciences which are not covered by other course offerings. The specific topics will be determined by student/instructor interest. Students should check with the Registrar or Dean of Arts and Sciences to determine course content for a specific semester.
 
UNIV 100 | THE UNIVERSITY EXPERIENCE (1-0-0)
F, S, SI
This course serves as students’ introduction to American university life. The content of the course is designed to give students an understanding of how a modern American university functions, their role as students at the university, and the most important information to know for successfully fulfilling that role. A foundation for future success is established by learning how the university operates, such as planning, scheduling and university policies, and what are the most common expectations for students.
 
WLDC 201 | WORLD CULTURES I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ENGL 102 | F, S, SI
A survey of the culture, ideas, and values of human civilization from their origins in Prehistory to the 17th Century. Emphasis is on the intellectual and artistic achievements of the ancient Middle East, Classical Greece and Rome, the Christian and Arab/Islamic Middle Ages, and Renaissance Italy showing how culture reflects and influences economic, social, and political development. Students are exposed to the creative process by reading from primary works of literature and philosophy and critically reviewing works of art, music, theater an
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