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ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
  • *** Administration office hours are 8am - 5pm
  • *** AUD ID cards for new students will be available in the Registrar’s Office starting Sunday, September 17, 2017
  • *** Fall 2017 semester starts September 04, 2017 and ends December 21, 2017
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSES LISTING - UNDERGRADUATE
ACCG 201 | PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BUSI 101, MATH 200 | F, S, SI, SII
This introductory course focuses on external financial reporting, providing a general overview of basic financial statements and the accounting process that produces them. This course covers topics such as the nature and purpose of accounting and accounting information, fundamental accounting concepts, principles and methods, the accounting cycle, accounting for current and fixed assets, introduction to liability and owners’ equity, with emphasis on sole proprietorship and partnership accounts, and introduction to financial statement analysis. Students must receive at least a C grade in this course in order to register for additional Accounting Major courses.
 
ACCG 211 | PRINCIPLES OF MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ACCG 201 | F, S, SI, SII
The emphasis of this course is on the use of accounting information internally by managers in an organization. Students will gain an understanding of the information needed by managers in planning, control and decision making. This course covers cost concepts and cost behavior, activity based costing, costing systems, operational budgets, standard costing, introduction to capital budgeting, cost-volume- profit analysis and relevant costs in decision making.
 
ACCG 301 | INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in ACCG 201 | F, S
This course focuses on theory and applications of financial accounting. It introduces the conceptual framework, the process of creating generally accepted accounting principles, and the fundamentals of financial statements – income statements, balance sheets, and statements of cash flow. Issues examined include cash and receivables, inventories, long-lived tangible and intangible assets. Moreover, the course investigates the foundations and applications of international accounting practices.
 
ACCG 302 | INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ACCG 301 | S, SI
This course is a continuation of the Intermediate Accounting I. It continues the in-depth analysis of accounting theory, and procedures underlying preparation of financial statements. Topics covered include short-term and long-term liabilities, stockholders’ equity, including dilutive securities and earnings per share, investments, revenue recognition, income taxes, pension and retirement benefits, leases, accounting changes and errors, statements of cash flows, and full disclosure in financial reporting.
 
ACCG 311 | COST ACCOUNTING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in ACCG 201, ACCG 211 | F, S, SI
This course examines various tools of cost accounting. It also examines means by which control can be exercised and the types of accounting information that allow for different means of planning and control. It covers the behavioral, quantitative, and qualitative aspects accounting, such as the nature of control, responsibility centers, performance evaluation, pricing of intermediate products, strategic planning, advanced topics in budgeting, costing, the balanced scorecard, executive compensation, and control for differentiated strategies.
 
ACCG 341 | ACCOUNTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in ACCG 201, ACCG 211 | F
This course provides an overview of major accounting subsystems with an emphasis on computer systems and internal control. It provides an overview of the design of information systems that support the accounting function of a firm. It focuses on business transaction cycles and processes, including Order Entry/Sales/Receivables; Purchase/Payables; Payroll/Human Resources; Fixed Assets; Production; Financing, and the General Ledger in the context of Enterprise Resource Systems (ERSs). Topics covered also include Computer Control and Audit; Computer Crime; and Reporting with XRBL.
 
ACCG 352 | FRAUD AUDITING AND FORENSIC ACCOUNTING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ACCG 302 | S
This course investigates the deceptions in financial and accounting processes. It is concerned with the detection and prevention of financial statement fraud. Topics covered include fraud examination techniques, internal control methodology, financial statement misrepresentation, conversion investigation methods, inquiry methods and fraud reports.
 
ACCG 401 | ADVANCED ACCOUNTING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ACCG 302 | F, S
This course focuses on the nature and structure of accounting information that is generated by the business firm. The main emphasis is not on the process through which accounting information is generated, but on how this information can be used in decision making by business managers. Topics covered include key financial statements and their interpretation, ratio analysis and its uses in performance evaluation as well as its limitations, financial planning and budgeting, use of accounting information for more effective control of operations, economic value added vs. ROI, and other approaches to performance measurement.
 
ACCG 421 | AUDITING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ACCG 302 | F
This course presents both the theoretical and practical aspects of auditing, including the responsibilities and function of the independent auditor. Topics include auditing objectives and concepts, types of audits, auditing standards, auditors’ professional code of ethics and auditors’ liability, risk and internal control, and the audit process.
 
ACCG 431 | U.S. TAXATION (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ACCG 401 | SI
This course covers knowledge applicable to federal income, estate and gift taxation and its application in practice. The content of this course is consistent with the AICPA Federal taxation specification outline tested in the CPA exam. The course covers topics such as taxation of individuals, corporations, partnerships, estates and trusts, exempt organizations, and preparers’ responsibilities.
 
ACCG 441 | INTERNATIONAL ACCOUNTING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ACCG 401 | F, S, SI
This course gives a broad overview of the global financial and accounting environment and addresses three distinct, but overlapping topic areas: financial reporting, financial analysis, and planning and control of multinational enterprises. The course covers topics such as financial reporting regimes, harmonization of international accounting differences, international accounting standard setting process, financial reporting issues relating to segment reporting, international financial ratio analysis, business combinations, intangible assets, foreign currency translation, accounting for changes in exchange rates, translation of financial statements, and managerial accounting issues relating to control of and performance measurement for foreign operations.
 
ACCG 491 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Senior Status or approval of the Chair, a grade of C or higher in ACCG 201 | Upon demand
This course presents a critical study of theory, research and practical applications related to advanced topics in accounting, not covered in any other accounting course. The specific topics will be determined by the interests of the students and the instructor.
 
BUSI 101 | INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (3-0-3)
F, S, SI, SII
An introductory survey of the business world, with consideration of the structure and forms of business enterprise, the nature of business relationships, and the diversity and choice of business careers. This course explores perceptions and misperceptions of business and its role in society, in a multicultural setting.
 
BUSI 201 | BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BUSI 101, ENGL 101 | F, S, SI, SII
Students in this course will learn the dynamics of human interaction in the workplace. The focus of the course is designed to increase the student’s understanding and implementation of effective communication behaviors and skills exhibited through written and oral communication forms. The fundamentals of business communication will introduce rhetorical principles, cultural adaptation and compositional practices necessary for successful communication in a range of professional and academic settings.
 
BUSI 211 | BUSINESS ETHICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: BUSI 201 (also applies to non-Business Majors) | F, S, SI
This course introduces students to the ethical context of business operating domestically as well as internationally. This course introduces students to a cooperative framework, which will embrace the foundations of regional differences and influences with respect to ethical decision making. The difficult issue of ethical relativism and other problems associated with multiple ethical systems are examined from theoretical as well as case-based applied perspectives.
 
BUSI 221 | PERSONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 200 (not open to students in the Finance Major) | F
This course covers fundamentals of personal finance including salary and compensation, budgeting, savings, investments, renting, establishing a home, property acquisition, installment contracts, purchase acquisition, scams and frauds, credit, insurance, retirement, taxes, and other financial issues.
 
BUSI 301 | BUSINESS RESEARCH (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BUSI 101, QUAN 201 | F, S, SI
Business analysts, managers and other professionals engaged in managerial and supervisory tasks are required to conduct research projects, or to supervise staff undertaking programs under their direction and to evaluate proposals and work completed by contracted professionals. To fulfill these responsibilities, managers must possess knowledge of research methodologies and techniques and be competent in their application. This course explores the role of research in business decision-making. The aim is to introduce students to the principal stages, terminology, concepts, processes and methodologies used in conducting research, and reporting and reviewing the results of research, and to enhance skills, knowledge and competencies in conducting research. Also, a major part of this course is dedicated to the development and execution of a business research project.
 
BUSI 311 | BUSINESS LAW I (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BUSI 101, BUSI 211 | F, S, SI
This course serves as an introduction to the issues arising in the legal environment in which businesses operate. Consideration is given to the law of contracts, business torts, warranties, agency law and business formation including potential liability exposure.
 
BUSI 312 | BUSINESS LAW II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: BUSI 311 | F, S
This course is a continuation of the introductory business law course and examines the following areas of law: corporate mergers, sales and lease contracts, negotiable instruments, debtor-creditor relationships including secured transactions and creditors rights and bankruptcy, intellectual property and internet law, securities regulations, the international legal environment and labor and employment law including discrimination.
 
BUSI 321 | BUSINESS IN THE INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ECON 202 | F, S, SI
Consideration is given to comparative analysis of market conditions and business practices in the global economy, with an emphasis on international economic factors and institutions, including trade, financing, exchange rates, development and government policies. Selected topics in international management are covered.
 
BUSI 331 | MANAGEMENT OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: COMP 101, MATH 200 | F, S, SI, SII
This course introduces students to the dynamic environment of Information Systems (IS) and Information Technology (IT). IS and IT influence every aspect of business. This course has 3 main topics: (1) using IS/IT for competitive advantage, (2) core IS/IT skills and management, and (3) IS/IT as an agent of change in all functional areas of business.
 
BUSI 401 | CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS ISSUES (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: ANTH 201, ECON 201, HIST 252, POLS 200 | Upon demand
This seminar-style course asks students to explore current issues in business. The primary focus of the course is business. In addition, all students are expected to look at the historical, political, and cultural factors involved. The course is designed to allow students to explore a primary area of interest while maintaining the interrelationships of all major areas of the BAIS degree. This course is also open to non-BAIS students.
 
BUSI 481 | INTERNSHIP (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Senior Status and approval of the Chair | Upon demand
With the aid of a supervising instructor, and under the direct supervision of a member of the host organization, the student participates in a practical onsite internship in which theoretical principles are applied to work situations. Upon the end of the internship, the student submits a report to the supervising instructor.
 
ECON 201 | PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 200 | F, S, SI, SII
Economic theory of the firm; resource allocation and price determination; the free market supply/demand mechanism; and pure and imperfect competition models are analyzed. Students
must receive at least a C grade in this course in order to register for additional Economics Major courses.
 
ECON 202 | PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: ECON 201 | F, S, SI, SII
Factors determining aggregate economic performance; employment, output, income, price level, economic growth and fluctuations, monetary and fiscal governmental policy; and evolution of economic doctrines are studied. Students must receive at least a C grade in this course in order to register for additional Economics Major courses.
 
ECON 302 | MONEY AND BANKING (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: completion of ECON 201 with a grade of C or higher, ECON 202 | F, S
This course covers the nature of monetary and banking theory; banking history; measurement factors used in determining economic activity; interrelationship of commercial banking system and foreign exchange transactions; balance of international payments; and financial intermediaries. In this course, we will learn about the determinants and impact of interest rates, the stock market, central and commercial banks operation and international financial architecture.
 
ECON 310 | HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: completion of ECON 201 with a grade of C or higher, ECON 202 | F, SI
Students completing this course will have obtained in depth knowledge of the history of economic thought, and its relationship to the rise of capitalism as a social, and increasingly global system. It is of important that students majoring in economics understand the historical context in which it has developed. Such knowledge allows students to better grasp complex economic phenomena such as the organization of capital markets, as well as the production and distribution of wealth, form both a historical and contemporary perspective.
 
ECON 311 | MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: completion of ECON 201 with a grade of C or higher, ECON 202 | S, SI
This course is an advanced analysis of rational economic decision-making in a managerial context. Topics include demand estimation, project analysis, business and economic forecasting, market structure and competition.
 
ECON 312 | INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: completion of ECON 201 with a grade of C or higher, ECON 202 | F, S
This course provides students with a more advanced treatment of the topics covered in principles of microeconomics. Particular emphasis is placed on resource allocation and price determination, as determined by consumers’ and firms’ behaviors. The course explores in detail the concepts of equilibrium and non-competitive markets. It also includes an introduction to game theory, and an advanced treatment of welfare economics, beyond that covered in principles courses.
 
ECON 313 | INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: completion of ECON 201 with a grade of C or higher, ECON 202 | F, S
Macroeconomics is the study of aggregate economic variables such as total production, the general price level, overall employment, total investment and savings, etc. in a specific country. The task of macroeconomists is to understand the fundamental relationships between these variables in order to make better predictions about the economy and advice on public policy. In this course, we will learn about macroeconomic variables and institutions, and use standard macroeconomic models in an attempt to understand why economies experience recessions and booms and what policy options governments might use to avoid decrease (or promote increases) in the standards of living.
 
ECON 401 | INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in ECON 201 | S
The course begins with an examination of basic theoretical models of the behavior of firms under different market structures such as perfect competition, oligopoly and monopoly. The focus then shifts to the applications of economics in antitrust cases. Industry cases and applications of antitrust policies are studied with an emphasis on the structure-conduct-performance approach to industrial organization.
 
ECON 402 | INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in ECON 202; completion of FINA 201 | S
This advanced elective course considers the current theories and the practical consequences of international trade. A variety of forms of commercial policy as a means of regulating trade are examined. Internal financial flows and exchange rate mechanisms are also considered. The domestic consequences for organizations of exchange rate policy are examined.
 
ECON 441 | PUBLIC FINANCE (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: grade of C or higher in ECON 201, ECON 202 | F
The focus of this course is on the economics of the public sector. Topics covered include the government budget and its impact on resource allocation, income distribution and economic stabilization; the government budgeting process and the principles and problems of budget determination, including both tax and expenditure aspects; tax shifting and incidence; and fiscal
and debt management policies.
 
ECON 442 | OIL AND ENERGY ECONOMICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: ECON 312, ECON 313 | S
The course provides students with an overview of the economics of energy markets, as well as the determinants of recent and historical price trends in the industry. Students are provided with an introduction into energy trading, and how such trading is influenced by economic and political events.
 
ECON 460 | APPLIED ECONOMETRICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: ECON 312, QUAN 301 | F, S
Econometrics is the application of statistical methods for the purpose of testing economic and business theories. Economic analysis and forecasting require a solid understanding of the principles of econometrics. This course will introduce students to the skills used in empirical research including, but not limited to, data collection, hypothesis testing, model specification, regression analysis, violations of regression assumptions and corrections, dummy variables and limited dependent variable models. Extensive focus will be on the intuition and application of econometric methods. This course is a more practical approach to econometrics. We will focus on using theory and software to application of econometrics to every-day problems. More importantly we’ll cover the practical issues of choosing a research topic, obtaining data and conducting analysis.
 
ECON 491 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECONOMICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Senior Status or approval of the Chair, grade of C or higher in ECON 201 |
Upon demand
This course represents a critical study into the theory, research and practical applications of an advanced topic in economic, one that is not covered in other economics courses. The specific  topics will be determined by the interest of students and the instructor.
 
FINA 201 | PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: ACCG 201, ECON 201, QUAN 201 | F, S, SI
The Principles of Finance course begins with cash-flow projections and evaluation of financial strength and weaknesses. Capital structure is dealt with followed by cost of capital and evaluation of capital investment opportunities. Students must receive at least a C grade in this course in order to register for additional Finance Major courses.
 
FINA 311 | CORPORATE FINANCE (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in FINA 201 | F, S, SI
This course studies the principles and practices of managerial finance and considers financial
instruments, sources and applications of funds, financial ratios, capital market analysis, capital budgeting, investments, and dividend decisions.
 
FINA 321 | FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in FINA 201 | F, S
This course looks at managing the business of managing money. Students study the market structure of global financial services including sources of funds, packaging, management, marketing and distribution of products and services. This course is an overview of the theory and practice of risk management, investment management, investment banking and market making.
 
FINA 331 | RISK AND INSURANCE (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in FINA 201 | S
This course introduces basic risk theory and elementary risk management principles and techniques. Topics covered include individual life insurance and annuity products; property/liability insurance, life/health insurance, and selected social insurance programs; insurers and their operations; guidelines for efficient purchase and use of insurance products.
 
FINA 411 | INVESTMENT AND PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: FINA 311, QUAN 301 | F, S, SI
This course is an analysis of the nature and underlying theory of investments and its utilization by the individual investor and portfolio manager. Topics include capital market theory, portfolio theory and management, options contracts, interest rate futures, factors influencing security prices, and the workings of the New York and London Stock Exchanges.
 
FINA 421 | COMMERCIAL BANKING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: FINA 411 | S, SI
This course will expose students to the commercial banking industry and the role and responsibilities of commercial bank officers. Topics covered will include the supervisory role of regulatory agencies, financial statement analysis, performance measurement, asset-liability management, tools and techniques for managing interest rate, credit, and liquidity risk.
 
FINA 431 | REAL ESTATE FINANCE AND INVESTMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in FINA 201 | S
This course is an introduction to the fundamental concepts, principles, analytical methods and tools used for making investment and finance decisions regarding real estate assets. A key objective of this course is to recognize the unique features that distinguish real estate investments from securities investments and from the corporate finance framework of investment decision making.
 
FINA 441 | MULTINATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: FINA 411 | F, S, SI
This course covers topics related to the financial operations of multinational corporations and international financial markets. The Foreign exchange rate determination, the parity conditions, and financing and investments by the multinational corporation will also be covered.
 
FINA 451 | FINANCIAL MODELING AND EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: FINA 411| F, S, SI
The objectives of the course are to provide students with an understanding of the theories
and methodologies of financial modeling and empirical analysis; to enable students to perform
financial analysis using computer models; and to apply financial principles in making corporate
decisions. The MS Excel is used as a vehicle for numerically solving and graphically interpreting problems that arise in areas such as financial statement analysis, portfolio management, option valuation, bond and stock valuation and analysis, and foreign exchange.
 
FINA 461 | DERIVATIVE SECURITIES (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: FINA 411 | F, S
Topics to be covered in this course include the principles and pricing of options, futures and forward contracts, and swaps; arbitrage, hedging and advanced futures and options strategies. In this course, the concepts of portfolio risk and insurance and financial innovations are examined along with the use of derivative securities in corporate financial management.
 
FINA 491 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN FINANCE (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Senior Status or approval of the Chair | Upon demand
This course is a critical study of theory and research related to selected topics in finance. The specific topics of the course will be determined by the interests of the students and the instructor.
 
MCOM 201 | PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING AND INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS (IMC) (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MKTG 201 | F, S, SI
This is the foundation course in Integrated Marketing Communications (IMC), covering its basic concepts and methods. Advertising is viewed from the perspective of being simply one of several promotional tools instrumental in brand building. Segmentation, target audience selection and positioning are given ample attention; and the role of data and databases in communication strategy formulation is reviewed. Basic media concepts are also studied, and students learn how to apply their knowledge to the task of determining media objectives and strategies. The organization and functioning of the modern communication agency are considered. Special attention is given to the creative product across all media and tools. IMC values and perspectives permeate coverage of all topics. Students must receive at least a C grade in this course in order to register for additional Marketing Communications Major courses.
 
MCOM 331 | PUBLIC RELATIONS MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MCOM 201 | S
This course will expose you to the fundamentals of Public Relations (PR) concepts and provide insights into how these concepts are applied by practitioners in the real world. It is designed to give you an overview of basic Public Relations theory and to introduce you to elements of Public Relations practice through topics such as Employee Relations, Crisis Management, Public Issue Campaigns, and Standards and Ethics in Public Relations.
 
MCOM 401 | CREATIVE EXECUTION FOR IMC (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MCOM 201 | S
This course reviews the concept of IMC and focuses on creative development in several disciplines: advertising (TV, press and radio), sales promotion, public relations, etc. Students learn not only how to evaluate executions in these disciplines but experience the rewards and frustrations of creative development, as they are challenged to conceive a variety of creative pieces. Effective correspondence and executional integration is considered in depth, and the student’s familiarity with TV and print production techniques is enhanced. Emphasis is placed on the successful completion of out-of-class creative projects.
 
MCOM 411 | MEDIA PLANNING AND BUYING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MCOM 201 | F
This course presents an overview of the media planning and buying functions within the IMC process. Basic measurements and calculations are reviewed as are the media performance measures of reach, frequency, effective frequency and GRP’s. The relationship between marketing strategy and media planning is established, and the strategic media planning process is covered in detail. Other topics: intermedia comparisons, quantitative and qualitative media evaluation, media negotiation as practiced in the Middle East, media research, media budget determination and allocation, media testing and experimentation and new media. Teaching methods consist of lecture, discussion (including case studies), and out-of-class projects.
 
MCOM 421 | IMC STRATEGY AND MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MCOM 401 or VCAD 353 | F
As indicated by its title, this is the major’s course in IMC strategy and management. The pivotal role of decision-making in communications strategy formulation and agency management provides the context for the course. The variables in decision-making are identified and the contribution of empirical research to issue-resolution is studied in depth. Students learn how to apply the five steps in Schultz’ value-based IMC model: customer identification, customer valuation, message/incentive planning, ROCI and post-program analysis and planning. Other specific topics considered: brand equity management, brand valuation, and the structural and human resource dimensions of agency management. While the lecture method of instruction prevails, ample opportunity is given for in-class discussion. Out-of-class projects revolve around real world case histories.
 
MCOM 431 | IMC CAMPAIGN DEVELOPMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MCOM 421 | S
This is the capstone course of the marketing communications and advertising majors. Students spend the entire term working in teams to prepare a response to a challenging real world case. The response consists of a fully developed IMC strategy and plan, together with executional solutions across a wide variety of communications disciplines. Class times are used for instructor facilitation, team meetings and lecture/discussion on topics germane to the Case, such as media planning, website construction, sales promotion, etc. Faculty other than the Instructor of Record and outside practitioners also make pedagogical contributions to the course.
 
MCOM 481 | STUDY INTERNSHIP (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: MCOM 431, Senior Status and approval of the Chair | F, S, SI
Students spend 25+ hours/week employed by an advertising agency/communications firm. Under the joint supervision of the faculty supervisor and their supervisor in the workplace, students’ progress against a skills inventory tailored to their chosen field of specialization. Grade assessment is influenced by the supervisor’s evaluation of the student as a potential entry-level employee. Students must provide the faculty supervisor with a copy of their résumé five weeks prior to the beginning of the term of the Internship.
 
MCOM 491 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN IMC (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MCOM 201, Senior Status or approval of the Chair | Upon demand
This course is a special in-depth project undertaken by the MCOM Major under the direction of the Chair or is a critical study of theory and research related to advanced topics in IMC. The interests of the students and the instructor will determine the specific topics of this course.
MGMT 201 | PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: BUSI 101, ENGL 102 | F, S, SI, SII
This course combines the elements of management (planning, organizing, implementing, controlling and evaluating) and applies leadership principles and characteristics to the exercise of these functions. Management and leadership as topics of study are analyzed and compared. Interpersonal skills required for effective leadership are explored. Students must receive at least a C grade in this course in order to register for additional Management Major courses.
 
MGMT 313 | OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in MGMT 201, QUAN 201 | F, S, SI
This course provides a study of the drivers of quality, customer satisfaction, efficiency and
productivity in service and manufacturing enterprises. Topics include product and service design, quality management, facility location and layout, materials management, scheduling, project management, and supply chain management.
 
MGMT 314 | BUSINESS PROCESS SIMULATION (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: MGMT 313, QUAN 301 | S
This course builds on the queuing theory introduced in QUAN 301 by providing in-depth analysis in solving waiting time problems. The theoretical aspects are followed through the use of Visual Interactive Discrete Event Simulation software. This software is used for solving real cases.
 
MGMT 321 | ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MGMT 201 | F, S, SI
Organizational behavior is the interdisciplinary field of study that investigates the impact of individuals, groups, and structure on the behavior of organizations, and how organizations manage their environments. The course covers the major theories, concepts, and tools that are employed in the field. Through the application of theoretical knowledge to exercises and case studies, students arrive at a better understanding of human behavior in the work environment.
 
MGMT 331 | HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MGMT 201 | F, S, SI
This is an introduction to the principles and practice of human resource management. The role of human resources in the modern business organization will be the main focus. Students will develop proficiency in solving human resource problems through lectures and case studies. The course provides instruction that will help current and aspiring managers to better understand the human resource functions in international, as well as, in the local economies.
 
MGMT 341 | PROJECT MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in MGMT 201, QUAN 201 | F, S, SI
This course draws upon the applied fields of organization behavior, management theory/science, and finance to develop a theoretical and very practical understanding of project management for students. The practical learning from this course is accomplished primarily through team-based project simulations.
 
MGMT 401 | INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in MGMT 201, MGMT 321 | F, S
Upon completion of this course, students are familiar with the globalization of markets and the economic interdependence of nations. In addition, the course develops skills that will assist students in designing, implementing and evaluating global strategies. Moreover, the socioeconomic, institutional, and structural variables underlying management practices, with a focus on human resources management in North America, Western Europe, Japan, East Asia, and the Arabian Gulf are considered.
 
MGMT 431 | LEADERSHIP (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MGMT 321 | F, SI
This course aims to provide students with a basic understanding of the role of leadership in the modern organization. Topics covered include different theories and definitions of leadership,
organizational goals and the leader’s role, leadership vs. management, leadership traits and characteristics, leadership styles and cultural differences, transformational leadership, charismatic leadership, transactional leadership, and gender and leadership. Case studies will be used to illustrate various leadership concepts, traits and styles in action.
 
MGMT 441 | ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND INNOVATION (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MGMT 201 | F, S, SI
This course is an overview of small business management and includes methods and procedures for establishing a small business; problem solving techniques required for successful operations; entrepreneurial traits and risks; location selection; and franchising.
 
MGMT 451 | SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MGMT 201 | F
This course examines the planning and management of the production and distribution of goods and services as an integrated process which connects suppliers, producers, retailers and the transportation system. Different components of this process are analyzed sequentially, including location choice, distribution system design, selection of suppliers and distributors, contracting issues, partnership formation, inventory policies, production plans and electronic data interchange.
 
MGMT 461 | MANAGING CHANGE AND INNOVATION (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MGMT 313 | F, S, SI
The world is a constantly changing place. Once accepted ways of doing business often fail to provide organization much needed growth. Organizations that do not successfully innovate and adapt to their new environments, grow old and weary and die. The history of business is replete with examples of once successful companies that fail and a few that managed to innovate and change. Contrary to what many think it is not the creative new idea but it is the execution of the idea that poses the biggest hurdle. It is vital and interesting to know what specific challenges successful established organizations face to execute innovative and change ideas. In this class we will focus on these challenges through our readings and analyses of several case studies.
 
MGMT 491 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Senior Status or approval of the Chair | Upon demand
This course is a critical study of theory and research related to selected topics in management. The specific topics of this course will be determined by the interests of the students and the instructor.
 
MGMT 499 | STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Senior Status and completion of all Business Foundation and Core courses,
and at least three required Major Electives | F, S, SI
This course introduces students to the elements of the strategic management theory and process including environmental analysis; internal analysis and diagnosis; generic strategy alternatives; strategic choice; and implementation.
 
MKTG 201 | PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: BUSI 101 | F, S, SI, SII
This course will expose you to the fundamentals of marketing concepts and provide insights into how these concepts are applied by practitioners in the real world. It is designed to give you an overview of basic marketing theory and to introduce you to the elements of marketing practice through topics such as buyer behavior, marketing research, developing marketing goods and services, pricing, distribution, and promotion. Students must receive at least a C grade in this course in order to register for additional Marketing Major courses.
 
MKTG 311 | SALES MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in MKTG 201 | F, S
The course is designed to equip students with a theoretical and practical understanding of effective sales management. Students will be furnished with the skills necessary to manage a sales department efficiently. Students will learn how to set selling objectives, to design marketing policies and selling strategies, to organize sales departments for firms of varying size, to coordinate a sales force, to recruit and train sales people, and to analyze markets from a sales perspective.
 
MKTG 321 | RETAIL MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MKTG 201 | F, SI
The course offers challenging opportunities for those who choose a management level career in the retail business area. It introduces students to the many diverse forces that exert their influence over the retail trade industry. The course covers basic concepts and methods of retail management. It also exposes students to current retail practices and various retailing career opportunities.
 
MKTG 361 | MARKETING RESEARCH (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: grade of C or higher in MKTG 201, QUAN 201 | F, S
The course will enable students to systematically study, conduct, and evaluate marketing research activities within a firm. Students will be exposed to survey planning, questionnaire construction, interviewing, data collection, data analysis, demand analysis and forecasting, and population sampling procedures.
 
MKTG 371 | E-MARKETING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MKTG 201 | F, S
The purpose of this course is to extend marketing theory and management to the e-business environment. The course will cover recent developments in e-marketing technologies, e-marketing strategies, the segmentation of e-markets, e-marketing communication and promotion, new product development and pricing policy in e-markets, and performance evaluation for the marketing function of the e-business firm.
 
MKTG 401 | CONSUMER BEHAVIOR (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: completion of MKTG 201 with a grade of C or higher | F, S
The emphasis of this course is on the descriptive and conceptual analysis of consumer buying behavior with a focus on the theory and research essential to the understanding of individual choice behavior.
 
MKTG 411 | SERVICES MARKETING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MKTG 201 | S
The course will enable students to focus on the unique challenges of managing services and
delivering quality service to customers. It will discuss how services are different from physical products, why they are different, and what strategies result from these differences. Students will appreciate the attraction, retention, and building of strong customer relationships through quality service and will recognize this as the foundation for a strong customer relationship management.
 
MKTG 421 | INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MKTG 201 | S, SI
The course incorporates marketing concepts into the framework of the world market place and international business. Students will be exposed to key global topics such as market segmentation; international physical distribution, pricing, and product life cycle; and regulations and embargoes and their effects on international marketing strategy.
 
MKTG 471 | STRATEGIC MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MKTG 201, Senior Status or approval of the Chair | F, S
The course enables students to view the marketing function of an organization from a strategic point of view. Planning, decision-making, implementation of product/price, promotion, advertising, and distribution and other management issues are discussed as they relate to market segmentation, consumer behavior and marketing communications. The course is based on case studies and product analyses.
 
MKTG 491 | SPECIAL TOPICS IN MARKETING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MKTG 201, Senior Status or approval of the Chair | Upon demand
This course is a critical study of theory and research related to selected topics in marketing. The interests of the students and the instructor will determine the specific topics of this course.
 
QUAN 201 | INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS STATISTICS (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 200 | F, S, SI, SII
This foundation course in descriptive and inferential statistics is inclusive of probability, discrete and continuous distributions, correlation and linear regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing.
 
QUAN 301 | QUANTITATIVE METHODS FOR DECISION-MAKING (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: QUAN 201 | F, S, SI
This is an advanced course in the quantitative techniques used in managerial decisions. Building
upon foundation coursework in statistics, students participate in advanced applications of deterministic and probabilistic models of decision theory, linear programming, simulation, and dynamic programming. 
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